101 of the Best Fiction Writing tips part 1

101 of the Best Fiction Writing Tips, Part I

  1. Calling characters by their proper names in dialogue almost always sound phoney. 5 Creative Flaws that Will Expose Your Lack of Storytelling ExperienceStoryfix
  2. There’s never a perfect time for writing, so stop waiting for itWhy There’ll Never Be a Perfect Time to WriteDaily Writing Tips
  3. Be selective about what you include in your story. You don’t need it allSix Structural Problems Writers Face & How to Fix them.Beyond the Margins
  4. Increase the stakes for your characters to prevent sagging story middlesWhen Middles SagWriters in the Storm
  5. Use a waterproof dive slate to take notes in the showerThe Three Writing Tools I Can’t Live WithoutWriter Unboxed
  6. Avoid extended dialogue without sufficient groundingFive Openings to AvoidNathan Bransford
  7. To write a better book, write your query letter firstWrite Your Query First for a Better Book. Writer Unboxed
  8. Bigger doesn’t mean better. Use simple words instead of deliberately choosing big wordsJust Call It Freaking “Green” Already.Writer Unboxed
  9. Writer’s block might mean you’re trying to write something you’re not ready to writeAdvice from Jonathan FranzenGotham Writers’ Workshop
  10. Epiphanies are overused in fiction, and can be boringThe Problem of the Eureka MomentBeyond the Margins
  11. Your novel shouldn’t be a thinly-disguised memoir12 Signs Your Novel Isn’t Ready to PublishAnne R. Allen
  12. Try to use all five senses when writing each scene of your book5 Tips for Writing Better SettingsJody Hedlund
  13. Don’t describe silence as ‘deafening’Things to Avoid [in Writing]Glass Cases
  14. Prologues usually just encourage infodumps. Prologues–This Side of Hell. Behler Blog
  15.  Using defense mechanisms can increase the tension between charactersUsing Defense Mechanisms for CharactersRoni Loren’s Writing Blog
  16. Less is more when it comes to describing your charactersWhy Less Detail Makes More Believable CharactersPlot to Punctuation
  17. In action scenes, vary sentence length and structure to increase or decrease speed and excitementHow to S.W.O.T. Your Story Over the FenceStoryfix
  18. In first drafts, you don’t need to know everything. Use placeholders (like X) as reminders to research a detail later. First Draft Secrets: Five Simple StepsWrite to Done
  19. Sometimes the most important moments in dialogue is what isn’t saidWhat Isn’t Said: Subtext in DialogueAuthor Culture
  20. Try using an ambiguous ending to create a plot twist (often works well in short stories). 10 Ways to Create a Plot TwistT.N. Tobias 
  21. Avoid overused, obvious symbolism in your fictionThe Obvious Symbolism PoliceGlass Cases
  22. Dialogue should reveal emotion through words, not adverbs (eg. “she said angrily”)Tips for Improving Dialogue In Your NovelThe Creative Penn
  23. Know everything about your characters’ backstories, but write about only 10% of itCharacter PlanningProcrastinating Writers
  24. Your protagonist can’t be easily satisfied. He needs to want something badly. Can You Write a Publishable First Novel? Anne R. Allen’s Blog
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