Water In Broken Glass by Odessa Rose – reviewed

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Reviewed: Jan 31, 2003

Water in a Broken Glass by Odessa Rose
La Caille Nous Publishing Company , September 2000
252 Pages, Paperback, $15.00
ISBN: 0964763575
Genre: Fiction

RAW Rating: 4.5 (out of 5)

Living by your own rules

First time author Odessa Rose’s novel, WATER IN A BROKEN GLASS, is a wonderful addition to any book collector’s library.  She introduces us to Tonya Mimms, a sought out sculptor with the inability to commit to anything other than her art.  The manner in which Rose writes this novel is just as vivid and colorful as a newly painted portrait while at the same time drives home the lesson of being true to yourself. 

Tonya spends the majority of her life hiding out in a studio on the third floor of America’s Art Institute working on projects passed on by her mentor.  She’s been involved with men before, but never on a long term basis as something just doesn’t click with her.  Meanwhile, she’s haunted by a girl (Meyoki) that she was drawn to in high school and questions her morals while at the same time trying to convince herself that the feelings aren’t real. She’s been taught by her mother that “women ain’t supposed to run with other women” so she uses this thought as well as other teachings of going to hell if she sins in various manners.  As a result, she spends all her adult life hiding from her innermost feelings and births sculptures that reflects what her mouth is incapable of saying.                                                                                                                           
It is during one of her times of trying to get away from her thoughts that she meets Malcolm Holland and instantly takes him up on a challenge.  Just when Tonya manages to have both love and sculpting in her life, she meets Satin Pierce, an openly gay bookstore owner.  Although sexually drawn to Satin, Tonya establishes a friendship with her and teeters on the edge of fulfilling the desires stewing inside her. 

In spite of the comfort her sculptures offer, she quickly falls over the edge and a domino effect happens in her life causing her to lash out at the ones she loves as she deals with the decisions of choosing and following her heart or doing what she’s been told is the right thing to do.

Odessa Rose has painted vivid descriptions of both the characters and the scenes in WATER IN A BROKEN GLASS and has given us an engaging debut novel.  Though the book touches on homosexuality, a subject that isn’t normally approved in society, Rose has done it in a tasteful manner that helps the reader understand the character’s feelings.  The plot is driven by both the desires and the judgment of the characters while teaching us to be ourselves and not worry about trying to live our lives to the standards that society or those around us have established.

Reviewed by Tee C. Royal, RAWSISTAZ.com
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Tee C. Royal is a freelance reader, reviewer, and editor residing in the suburbs of Atlanta.

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Werelove. by Kisha Spletzer

Werelove
“Duality–You say that like it’s a bad thing.”
Welcome to the Werelove Universe
This dark PN romance series involves Weres (shapeshifters) and their lives.

The first book, Dusk Conspiracy, is available now. I’m proud to say that

Dusk Conspiracy was my 2008 NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) novel.
Won a 2010 Top Pick award from Night Owl Reviews. [Read the review here]
Received a 4-star rating from Bitten By Books [Read the review here]
2011: made its debut in an Amazon top 100 bestseller list. Dusk Conspiracy held steady at the #95 position in the German Kindle eBooks Foreign Language/English/Science Fiction & Fantasy category during the last two weeks of September 2011.
Werelove Dusk Conspiracy and Midnight Revelations have been picked up for Turkish translation by Artemis Yayinlari Publishing. To hear more about this amazing dealing, visit my Kishaz Talks vlog channel.
Latest Updates
June 14, 2012

Win Your Chance to Appear in Books 4 & 5.

CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

*Added sections: Ask a ?, Get An Answer (6/14)

*Updated sections: Character Insights: Cecily Le Croix (6/4)

*Dusk Conspiracy (Book 1) and Midnight Revelations (Book 2) are available

Smashwords.com [ebook formats]
Amazon & the Kindle Store
Nook
Weres and Humans Visited

Home
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History
Human Society
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The Novels
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Copyright © 2009-2012 Lakisha Spletzer. All Rights Reserved.

Amy Joy Tips For The Would Be Authors

13 April, 2012   
Published by Amy Joy in Fiction Tips, Nonfiction Tips, Self Publishing, The Writing Life
With indie publishing booming and e-readership expanding daily, there’s never been a better time to become a writer. As a published author and writing instructor, my advice to the “would-be” author is this:

Write your book.

Plenty of people say they are going to write a book someday, but they never do. If you’re serious, then stop talking about it and start writing.
Re-write until you never want to look at your book again.

I know this probably sounds crazy, but if you read about successful writers, you’ll find that most have this in common: by the time they finished a book, they felt like they never wanted to look at it again. This has been true in my experience, and it’s been true for my writing students as well. So, if you still like yours when you’ve finished, there’s a decent chance you haven’t revised and edited enough yet. (Unfortunately, if you don’t find the errors in your work, your reviewers will.)
Don’t skimp on editing.

Editing errors are embarrassing and hurt your credibility as a writer. Have many people beta-read your book before you publish, and use a professional editor.
Read and research everything you can about publishing.

There are so many great, free, online resources out there for writers today to learn about traditional and indie publishing. Use these. They will help you learn what you need to do and help keep you from having to learn everything the hard way.
If you go indie, use a professional cover designer.

Like it or not, your audience will judge your book first by its cover. It’s the first clue potential readers about the quality and content of the book. If the cover doesn’t appeal to them, most won’t bother to read the description or look inside.
Don’t give up.

If you really want to do this, there’s no reason you can’t. I always remind myself this: If others have done it, that means I can too! (So can you!)

Amy Joy is the IndieWriteNet admin and indie author of serious and silly stories for adults and kids. Her debut novel, The Academie (dystopian YA) is a Quarterfinalist for the 2012 Amazon Breakthrough Novel award. She is also the creator of the What Happens Next?(TM) series for children 8-12, including The Princess and the Pepperoni Pizza. You can learn more at her author website http://amysjoy.com or her series website http://theacademieseries.com.

Invocation of the Muse Calliope.

“From my love I spread thin, I pray to Calliope hold. Bless my soul and words alike, thou timid things, free me. If fitting, cleanse my eyes of shadow and weep upon my lips an affinity, for the truth I seek whole.”
— Invocation of the Muse Calliope, Akil N. De Berry
#Invocation #Muse #Calliope #Writing #2012 #Akil N. DeBerry #Akil N. De Berry #A. N. DeBerry #A. N. De Berry #Frantic Ink

A Dance With Dragons

A DANCE WITH DRAGONS (reviewed on October 15, 2011)
The fifth installment in Martin’s (A Game of Thrones, 1996, etc.) Song of Ice and Fire fantasy series.

Fans of the author’s work will likely be satisfied with this volume ipso facto, for it’s vintage Martin: It’s a little cynical, plenty dark, with not many laughs and, truth be told, not much action. There’s the usual blend of exposition, sometimes seemingly endless, and the usual swords-and-sorcery dialogue: “The plunder from Astapor was much less than you were promised in Volantis, and I took the lion’s share of it.” “Two kings to wake the dragon. The father first and then the son, so both die kings.” “False friends, treacherous servants, men who had professed undying love, even her own blood…all of them had deserted her in her hour of need.” Martin has been likened to J.R.R. Tolkien, but Tolkien was never quite so ponderous, and certainly not so obsessed with bodily functions of various sorts: “The Grand Maester befouled himself in dying, and the stink was so abominable that I thought I might choke.” “When you bugger a man you expect a squeal or two.” Indeed. Apart from all that, this volume furthers Martin’s long tale of a vast world war of the kind that sweeps through Middle Earth in LOTR, though some of the characters seem to have lost their taste for it; the once-scary Tyrion Lannister mostly mopes around, alternately insomniacal and prurient, while out on The Wall the stalwart Jon Snow comes over all Hamlety, wondering what to do, soliciting input and then keeping his own counsel. A few hundred pages of this, and one longs in vain for piles of headless corpses and flesh singed with the fire of dragon breath—something, anything, to induce a squeal.  

Is Ice and Fire drawing to a close? There’s plenty of wiggle room for more volumes in the series, but on the evidence, one wonders if Martin isn’t getting a little tired of it.

Pub Date: July 12th, 2011
ISBN: 978-0-553-80147-7
Page count: 1040pp
Publisher: Bantam
Review Posted Online: Sept. 27th, 2011
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15th, 2011

Fantasy Book Review.

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Fantasy Book Review is dedicated to reading and reviewing the very best fantasy books for children and adults (both young and old). Featuring interviews, the latest fantasy news, audio-book reviews and competitions we aim to provide fantasy fans around the world with a useful, interesting and informative guide to the genre. If you would like to help us to read and review these fantastic books then do please get in touch.
Featured Book: Deep into the Heart of a Rose by Greg Denny

Fantasy Book Review Book of the Month, February 2012
A Tolkien inspired romantic fantasy that all starts with an extremely loving and well written letter… G.T. Denny’s novel, Deep into the Heart of a Rose, will help usher in a new generation of love sick teens. If you love fantasy and adventure fiction then this book is for you. Well written, charmingly detailed and epic, this truly is a must read for 2012.
Read our full review of Deep into the Heart of a Rose
For more information, visit http://gtdenny.com/

Rafael Abalos- Fantasy Novelist

Rafael Ábalos
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Rafael Ábalos

Rafael Ábalos at the ‘Comédie du Livre’ of Montpellier, France, 2009.
Born October 12, 1956 (age 55)
Archidona, Málaga, Spain
Occupation Novelist
Language Spanish
Nationality Spanish
Genres Fantasy, Children’s Literature
Notable work(s) Grimpow: The Invisible Road
Rafael Ábalos (born 12 October 1956, Archidona, Málaga) is a Spanish author of the bestseller book Grimpow: The Invisible Road (ISBN 0385733747) published in 2007.[1][2] The children’s fantasy novel was about a boy finding a mysterious amulet in France who becomes a focus of a “centuries-old mission” to enlighten humanity.[2] According to a review in Publishers Weekly, Ábalos “blends the grand-scale storytelling prowess and epic quest element of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings with the cryptographic intrigue of Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code”, and gave it a positive review.[2] The book was published by Random House.[3]
[edit]References

^ Ed Park (2011). “Running in circles”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2011-02-12.
^ a b c Staff writer (2007). “Rafael Ábalos, translated by Noël Baca Castex. Delacorte”. Publishers Weekly. ISBN ISBN 978-0-385-73374-8. Retrieved 2011-02-12.
^ Staff writer (2007). “Random House Children’s Books”. Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 2011-02-12. “Random House Children’s Books … Grimpow: The Invisible Road by Rafael Ábalos;”

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