Coming soon ‘Lidia’ by A.N.DeBerry

Akil N. DeBerry
September 13
Lidia, a novel by Akil N. DeBerry. (Opening lines v.002) “They were a feat of arrogance, of pride, of hope; and yet it was only after the world had died around them that they had truly took hold. Fire would barely scorch them and poisons only killed few, and seemed, with each of their dying breaths, they whispered somehow to the other, the secrets of servival. They were the Goliaths, trees engineered from countless others to save a world that no longer was, or ever would be again. And here, where once long ago a city unparalleled stood, they now conquered.”

Shots Fired by Gary Jones with reviews.

by:
Gary P. Jones (Author)

ISBN: 0-7414-3244-7 ©2006
Price: $18.95
Book Size: 5.5” x 8.5” , 371 pages
Category/Subject: TRUE CRIME / Murder / General

“Shots Fired!” When these two simple, yet terrible, words are heard over the police radio everything else immediately stops! A police officer somewhere is in trouble, and needs help!
Abstract:
The 1970’s was the deadliest decade in modern law enforcement history and more police officers died than during any other decade of the 20th Century. In Fort Lauderdale, the “Venice of America,” violent crime was almost out of control and to stem this vicious tide the Fort Lauderdale Police Department created the Tactical Impact Unit. Written with all the drama and excitement of a novel, Badge 149 – ‘Shots Fired!’ tells the true story of this small group of men and of the daring exploits that made them so well-known and respected.

Click Here for a SNEAK PEEK of this book.
Customer Reviews

  WOW , 11/20/2006
Reviewer: Brian Dodge
This book is a must read! Not just for those in law enforcement but those who want to get a “glimpse” at just how difficult the “JOB” can be. Jones depicts the right feelings and thoughts that happen when an officer is in a stressful situation and just serves as a reminder how much law enforcement does for our community. GREAT READING!!!!
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  A Must-Read Book , 09/25/2006
Reviewer: Barry Margolis
Simply stated, this is not only required reading for past and present law enforcement, but for ANYONE who ever wondered just what lengths police officers had to go to in order to Protect and Serve. Thank you, Gary, for telling it just the way it was!
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  True Depiction , 10/16/2006
Reviewer: vicki benoit
Gary Jones wrote this book from a perspective few sew of police officers…we are human. Many books depict us as hardcore and uncaring. This books reveals the hard work, dedication, the emotions up and down, and the frustration and fears we all experience.
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  As Real As It Gets , 10/17/2006
Reviewer: Tom Woolsey
As a former member of the Tactical Impact Unit I have to say that this book put me right back into the incidents that Gary depicted in the chapters. The greatest and most dedicated group of people I have had the privilege of knowing. T.I.U. established guidelines for future special units in law enforcement.
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  Badge 149 ‘Shots Fired’ , 12/11/2006
Reviewer: Major Jim Eskew
An outstanding portrayal of the fight against criminal events unfolding in real life drama. This comes from a very dedicated officer alone with his thoughts as he trys to right wrongs and protect the community within which we live. His courage, honesty and desire to defeat the bad guys and protect the victims, is an inspiration to us all. ‘Shots fired’ is a MUST read!

Rafael Abalos- Fantasy Novelist

Rafael Ábalos
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Rafael Ábalos

Rafael Ábalos at the ‘Comédie du Livre’ of Montpellier, France, 2009.
Born October 12, 1956 (age 55)
Archidona, Málaga, Spain
Occupation Novelist
Language Spanish
Nationality Spanish
Genres Fantasy, Children’s Literature
Notable work(s) Grimpow: The Invisible Road
Rafael Ábalos (born 12 October 1956, Archidona, Málaga) is a Spanish author of the bestseller book Grimpow: The Invisible Road (ISBN 0385733747) published in 2007.[1][2] The children’s fantasy novel was about a boy finding a mysterious amulet in France who becomes a focus of a “centuries-old mission” to enlighten humanity.[2] According to a review in Publishers Weekly, Ábalos “blends the grand-scale storytelling prowess and epic quest element of Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings with the cryptographic intrigue of Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code”, and gave it a positive review.[2] The book was published by Random House.[3]
[edit]References

^ Ed Park (2011). “Running in circles”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2011-02-12.
^ a b c Staff writer (2007). “Rafael Ábalos, translated by Noël Baca Castex. Delacorte”. Publishers Weekly. ISBN ISBN 978-0-385-73374-8. Retrieved 2011-02-12.
^ Staff writer (2007). “Random House Children’s Books”. Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 2011-02-12. “Random House Children’s Books … Grimpow: The Invisible Road by Rafael Ábalos;”

Brandon Sanderson Shares Writing Secrets

Editor’s Choice
How To Write a Fantasy Novel
Bestselling Author of Mistborn Trilogy Shares his Writing Secrets

Nov 21, 2008Joe Lam

MISTBORN: THE FINAL EMPIRE – BRANDON SANDERSON
New York Times Bestselling author Brandon Sanderson shares his process of writing fantasy, how he handles character & plot, and how he deals with rewrites.
Suite101 sat down with Brandon Sanderson, fantasy author to discuss writing tips & tricks that he uses to write a successful fantasy novel. Sanderson is the author of Elantris, the Mistborn Trilogy, and also the childrens series, Alcatraz and The Evil Librarians.

Suite101: What is your process when you go about writing a book?

Sanderson: It’s honestly different for every book. For Alcatraz and The Evil Librarians, my middle grade book, I write much more off the cuff. I want them to be fun and light and free. I’m writing books that are more snappy so to keep that improve style, I do them very much off the cuff and that requires a lot of revision to make them actually work, but I like that spontaneity that comes from almost writing a free-write.

For my epic fantasy, I plan a lot. I do a lot of outlining, a lot of world building, a lot of preparation. Sometimes I’ll write hundreds of thousands of words of preparation before I’ll write the books themselves. I’ll lay that groundwork and then I’ll keep a floating outline, which is an outline I’m not married to. I’m willing to change it but I’ve got goals in that outline, big important scenes I need to get to.

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Suite101: What does it take to be a solid fantasy writer?

Sanderson: Determination. To be a writer of anything, I would say that the number one important thing to do is to read a lot. Widely in all genres, but specifically in the genre you want to write in. Know the genre, write what you love and so read what you love. And the next things is, just work at it.

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Suite101: How to do you approach character development and plot in your stories?

Sanderson: I actually approach them very differently. Plot I tend to plan a lot ahead of time, I like to have explosive endings and for an ending to really work for me, I have to have it planned out before I start the book usually. If I’m not excited about the ending, I don’t start the book because I need an exciting ending. If it pulls me through to the end, I assume it will pull readers too.

For character, I don’t have what the characters are going to do outlined, I have who they are when they start the book. I have their conflicts and what’s inside of them, but then I let them change and grow as it’s a little bit more natural in writing the book. I can’t jump around in a book and write the ending or the middle first, I have to start at the beginning because my characters begin as people.

Suite101: In terms of editing, how often do you revise your own work? Do you just write it once and then send it out to an editor?

Sanderson: I revise quite heavily. I usually do between seven and ten drafts depending on the book. The first three or four are done only with my desires. I read through and I change it and usually I’ll give myself some space and time between those. Then I’ll run it through writing groups. It’s not that I’m looking for advice on how to make the story better. I’m looking for how people respond to my writing to see if those are the responses I want so I can make the right emotions in the right places.

Learn more about Brandon’s fantasy novels at: Mistborn Trilogy: Interview With Fantasy Author

Also visit: Brandon Sanderson’s Official Website

Copyright Joe Lam. Contact the author to obtain permission for republication.

Joe Lam – My Life’s Purpose “To Benefit Humanity through Storytelling”. About Me I have worked in the entertainment industry for over 10 …

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The Fantasy Fiction Formula

“Rob Parnell is the World’s Foremost Writing Guru” – Writers Digest Best Writers’ Site – Critters #1 Best Writers’ Info Site 2010 – 2011. Rob is listed in Who’s Who 2011/12

“News, Views & Clues… to Writing Success”

stop Crazy Cut Price: Writing Resources from Rob Parnell

The Fantasy Fiction Formula

Rob Parnell

Now, most fantasy writers have been constructing their fantasy world since childhood. It grows with them; they add to it as they develop as writers until it’s so real to them that writing about it feels effortless – even when they seem to have created a huge, sophisticated universe.

But if you’re new to the genre, where do you start?

Many professional fantasy writers will joke about ‘the formula’ for good fantasy because it does exist and good fantasy authors still use it – not because they’re lazy but because the fans want it – in fact insist on it!

It has been condensed thus: ‘Hero, artifact, quest’. That’s it. All you need to start a fantasy novel! Think Froddo, the ring and the journey to Mordor and you’ll see what I mean.

I prefer something a little more organic and creative.

Get a very large sheet of paper. A3 at least – that’s about 3 feet by 2 in the US. Draw an outline for your kingdom – or kingdoms. Experiment with the shape of coastlines, archipelagos and spits. Maybe put some islands around it.

Use a blue crayon or chalk to shade in the sea and draw a compass somewhere on the paper to orientate the map. Maybe a scale too: one inch equals 100 miles say.

Divide your kingdom into countries or regions – draw in the border lines.

Using different color pencils, add mountain ranges, lakes, rivers, whatever you like. Have lots of fun with this bit!

Cities normally grow up on rivers and ports – so start placing important cities and towns, farming communities, military posts etc. Start thinking about trade routes, badlands and resistance enclaves where nobody goes…

Don’t forget that most fantasy is set in an entirely medieval world where technology is limited to bows and arrows, spears and fire, with a liberal sprinkling of magical swords, jewels or articles of clothing like magic capes or belts. Don’t take this element too lightly.

I have known many writers who try to insert guns and flying machines into their world and are promptly asked to remove them by pedantic publishers!

Now for some writing.

Invent three major castes of inhabitants. For example: human, elven and dwarves say, or make up your own. One of the caste may be dragons if you want to be faithful to the ‘formula’.

Describe the class system for each. Who’s the king or the head magician, how the government of Elders work, what the peasants do, whether there are bands of mercenaries roaming the countryside, that kind of thing.

Now think of three characters for each caste – have them related for maximum impact. For instance three characters might be Princess Tumar who needs to regain the crown after her father was killed by the evil Majadon, aided by her younger brother.

Write a paragraph for every character, describing their physical appearance.

Give each of the characters an agenda that is at odds with at least two of the other characters.

Write a few pages describing the scenario you have invented.

By now you should be feeling an attachment to one or more character. Choose one to be the hero and give him or her an important quest that they must undertake to gain maturity, power or enlightenment (perhaps all three!)

Next, choose a magic artifact that the character must obtain during this quest. Don’t choose a book!

Then create a huge threatening situation (a war, natural disaster or magical event) in which the characters are all at risk – of losing their power, authority, self respect, lives etc. and then…

Open up a new file and write: Chapter One.

Okay, over to you!

Go here for my award winning Fantasy Course

Best regards and keep writing!

Rob Parnell
rob@easywaytowrite.com
Your Success is My Concern
The Easy Way to Write

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“The Secret World of Louis Lambert”

The Secret World of Louis Lambert (excerpt)

~The Secret World of Louis Lambert, A Novel by A. N. De Berry~

“Tell me, do you love her?” Lambert asked, as he sat down next to him in the garden.

James looked up into the branches of the trees, searching for an answer he need not search for. Of course I do, he thought as he watched the day’s dyeing twilight dance across the leaves; kissed so softly by a western wind.

“I do, more then anything,” James said, raising from his seat with a frustrated breath. “I fear how much I do,” he said as he began to pace. “Nothing has ever felt so right, and yet so undeserving. Since first kiss, my very breath seems but tribute that I would lovingly give,” James said before stopping. “I now have knowelege of a thing I would deem beyond beauty, beyond love, and yet feel ever so damned and cursed for it’s very knowing.”

“And why is that?” Lambert asked, meeting his troubled eyes.

“Because it is unreturned.” He said with a defeated shake of his head, “I addmit it, I tried dearly not to fall so, as she had admitted to me of trying likewise, but before a second breath I found my body aching in agony, and only realized then that I had already met earth.”

Lambert looked away from him and up to those same trees, watching the sun’s setting light, seemingly chase and flee the shadows, there numbers growing by the second. “It has be said,” he started, “that a love unreturned, is no lesser love, and no less important,” he told him, finishing just shy of a whisper. “You love her, fine. Now you must bear it, never doubting it. Emotions are ghastly things, but when one is lucky enough to understand the one’s that rule them, never betray them!” he said in confusion, bewildered by his own words. “Do so and you betray yourself, and in the end of all things, all we truly ever have in this world, is self. Never forget that.” He said with a shake of his head,  as he raised from his seat and turned to leave, “Never forget.”

101 of the Best Fiction Writing tips part 1

101 of the Best Fiction Writing Tips, Part I

  1. Calling characters by their proper names in dialogue almost always sound phoney. 5 Creative Flaws that Will Expose Your Lack of Storytelling ExperienceStoryfix
  2. There’s never a perfect time for writing, so stop waiting for itWhy There’ll Never Be a Perfect Time to WriteDaily Writing Tips
  3. Be selective about what you include in your story. You don’t need it allSix Structural Problems Writers Face & How to Fix them.Beyond the Margins
  4. Increase the stakes for your characters to prevent sagging story middlesWhen Middles SagWriters in the Storm
  5. Use a waterproof dive slate to take notes in the showerThe Three Writing Tools I Can’t Live WithoutWriter Unboxed
  6. Avoid extended dialogue without sufficient groundingFive Openings to AvoidNathan Bransford
  7. To write a better book, write your query letter firstWrite Your Query First for a Better Book. Writer Unboxed
  8. Bigger doesn’t mean better. Use simple words instead of deliberately choosing big wordsJust Call It Freaking “Green” Already.Writer Unboxed
  9. Writer’s block might mean you’re trying to write something you’re not ready to writeAdvice from Jonathan FranzenGotham Writers’ Workshop
  10. Epiphanies are overused in fiction, and can be boringThe Problem of the Eureka MomentBeyond the Margins
  11. Your novel shouldn’t be a thinly-disguised memoir12 Signs Your Novel Isn’t Ready to PublishAnne R. Allen
  12. Try to use all five senses when writing each scene of your book5 Tips for Writing Better SettingsJody Hedlund
  13. Don’t describe silence as ‘deafening’Things to Avoid [in Writing]Glass Cases
  14. Prologues usually just encourage infodumps. Prologues–This Side of Hell. Behler Blog
  15.  Using defense mechanisms can increase the tension between charactersUsing Defense Mechanisms for CharactersRoni Loren’s Writing Blog
  16. Less is more when it comes to describing your charactersWhy Less Detail Makes More Believable CharactersPlot to Punctuation
  17. In action scenes, vary sentence length and structure to increase or decrease speed and excitementHow to S.W.O.T. Your Story Over the FenceStoryfix
  18. In first drafts, you don’t need to know everything. Use placeholders (like X) as reminders to research a detail later. First Draft Secrets: Five Simple StepsWrite to Done
  19. Sometimes the most important moments in dialogue is what isn’t saidWhat Isn’t Said: Subtext in DialogueAuthor Culture
  20. Try using an ambiguous ending to create a plot twist (often works well in short stories). 10 Ways to Create a Plot TwistT.N. Tobias 
  21. Avoid overused, obvious symbolism in your fictionThe Obvious Symbolism PoliceGlass Cases
  22. Dialogue should reveal emotion through words, not adverbs (eg. “she said angrily”)Tips for Improving Dialogue In Your NovelThe Creative Penn
  23. Know everything about your characters’ backstories, but write about only 10% of itCharacter PlanningProcrastinating Writers
  24. Your protagonist can’t be easily satisfied. He needs to want something badly. Can You Write a Publishable First Novel? Anne R. Allen’s Blog

Only after life’s last breath!

‎”Only after life’s last breath, has time truly ran out. Till then, the world is yours, and you must merely be foolish enough to see it!” – Akil N. De Berry ^_^ Today’s mood, CoNqUeSt!!!

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